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JDRF is undergoing a transformation.
We are becoming Breakthrough T1D in October.

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JDRF

JDRF UK to become Breakthrough T1D in major international rebrand

The leading global type 1 diabetes charity, JDRF International (JDRF) is proud to unveil its new brand and name, Breakthrough T1D. The new name embodies its mission to cure and treat type 1 diabetes (T1D), while supporting everyone who lives with the condition.
Content last reviewed and updated: 04.06.2024

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The name Breakthrough T1D, which JDRF UK will roll out in October, reflects the charity’s exclusive focus on the needs of the T1D community. Breakthrough T1D will continue JDRF’s journey, accelerating breakthroughs in research, breakthroughs in access to treatments, and bringing the T1D community together to help everyone make their own personal breakthroughs.

Accelerating breakthroughs

Since launching over 50 years ago we have been at the forefront of every major type 1 research breakthrough, bringing life-changing treatments and technologies to the people who need them the most.

With the generous support of the global T1D community who have given their time, donations and expertise, we have connected the world’s brightest minds to advance treatments, influence policy, and improve access to care, all over the world. This vital work will gather momentum, accelerating breakthroughs as our new name enables us to raise more awareness, engage with more supporters and gain more funding for our vital work.

A name that expresses our impact

Karen Addington, JDRF UK CEO says: “Today is a monumental day in our history, with a new name that truly expresses our impact, our ambition and our steadfast support of the entire T1D community. We’re proud to spearhead the global research endeavour to prevent, treat and cure type 1 diabetes, while making everyday life better for the people who face it. Today, we are opening doors that were once closed by diagnosis and people with T1D are living healthier, longer lives. Tomorrow, we will make this condition a thing of the past, by accelerating research and driving innovation forward.”

Rachel Connor, Director of Research Partnerships at JDRF UK says: “Our research is changing the reality of T1D. Breakthroughs in prevention, treatment, and cure research, are moving fast to transform the experience of people with T1D. Thanks to our support of technology research, innovations like continuous glucose monitoring and hybrid closed loop are part of everyday life with T1D for increasing numbers of people. Programmes like the ELSA Study offer hope for a better start to managing T1D, and with potential new immunotherapies on the horizon, precious years without the need for insulin could be gained. T1D research is moving forward at speed, driven by global collaboration, we look forward to delivering the next generation of breakthroughs that will inexorably lead to a world without T1D.”

An international network

JDRF in the US has leveraged the strength of the international network with affiliate charities in Canada, Australia, The Netherlands, and Israel to listen to thousands of supporters and stakeholders around the world who have shared their thoughts and feelings about what the charity means to them.

The global insight findings show that the JDRF name, which originally stood for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, has been limiting our ability to reach people of all ages with type 1 diabetes. We have now have developed a visionary, powerful brand that more accurately reflects who we are: the world leader in type 1 diabetes research, advocacy, and inclusive community support.

Changes in language

JDRF has led the search for cures for T1D since the organisation was founded more than 50 years ago in the US by families of children living with T1D. JDRF UK was started 37 years ago. At that time, the condition was commonly known as ‘Juvenile Diabetes’ because it was frequently diagnosed in, and strongly associated with, young children. As Juvenile Diabetes is no longer a term used by clinicians, it’s right that we reflect on our language and use recognised terms, such as T1D.

The term T1D has been chosen as it is both used and recognised by people living with the condition. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition caused by the immune system mistakenly attacking insulin-making beta cells in the pancreas. It’s not related to lifestyle, it’s not reversible and it’s not currently curable. Using the term T1D will help us to address stigma and common misconceptions, providing clarity about our exclusive focus on type 1 diabetes.

A new logo

Our new logo represents breakthroughs, both big and small. The new name physically breaks through a burst, symbolising inspiration, and innovation. It demonstrates the impact of what Breakthrough T1D will do for the community.

Rolling out the changes

JDRF International in the US will launch the charity’s new identity today and fully transition into Breakthrough T1D. Our international affiliates will each adapt an individual brand transition timeline that aligns with their country’s specific advocacy efforts and community events. In the UK, we will become Breakthrough T1D with the brand being adopted across our website, signage and supporter materials and launch a high-profile awareness campaign in October.

Karen Addington adds: “JDRF was founded upon a culture of innovation, progress, ambition and collaboration. 50 years on from the founding of JDRF in the US, Breakthrough T1D will build on that proud set of values and continue to break research boundaries in accelerating the prevention, treatment and cure for type 1 diabetes.”

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Karen Addington

What's in a name?

Our CEO, Karen Addington, on how our new brand was developed and how we're pushing forward in a golden age of type 1 research.

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