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  • Type 1 diabetes is a chronic, life-threatening condition which has a lifelong impact on those diagnosed & their families.
  • Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes is not linked to being overweight, lack of exercise or other lifestyle factors.
  • Type 1 diabetes affects 400,000 people in the UK, enough to fill Wembley Stadium more than 4 times over.
  • Type 1 diabetes often strikes in childhood. It stays with people for the rest of their lives.
  • Type 1 diabetes happens because the body’s own immune system attacks cells in the pancreas that produce insulin.
  • Type 1 diabetes is no-one’s fault. It can happen to anyone and is not caused by anything they or their parents did or didn’t do.
  • Over 29,000 children in the UK have type 1 diabetes – you would need 70 jumbo jets to take them all on holiday.
  • People with type 1 diabetes rely on insulin injections/infusions and up to 10-12 finger prick tests every day just to stay alive.
  • Incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing by about 4% each year, and more quickly in children under five.
  • Type 1 diabetes is 50 times more common in under 18s than type 2 diabetes.
  • The peak age for diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in the UK is 10-14 years but is becoming younger.
  • Incidence of type 1 diabetes has increased five-fold in the under-five age group in the last 20 years.
  • Half of people with type 1 diabetes in the UK are diagnosed under the age of 15 and 90% are diagnosed by 30.
  • Common signs of type 1 diabetes are thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, weight loss, ketones (pear drop smell on breath).
  • Worldwide, 78,000 children (aged 14 and under) develop type 1 diabetes each year.
  • Finland has the highest rate of type 1 diabetes in the world.
  • Type 1 diabetes is 30 times more common in Scandinavia than in Japan, which has one of the lowest rates of the condition globally.
  • 85% of people who develop type 1 diabetes have no relative with it. However, genetic factors pre-dispose people to developing it.
  • Today we know of more than 50 genes that are associated with the risk of developing type 1 diabetes.
  • More men have type 1 diabetes in Scotland compared with women – 56.1% compared with 43.9%.
  • There are very few foods that someone with type 1 diabetes cannot eat and no special foods are required.
  • An hour of research into type 1 diabetes costs around £60. Every bit of research brings us a step closer to finding the cure.
  • The incidence of type 1 diabetes in the UK has doubled every 20 years since 1945.
  • On a global level JDRF has dedicated over £1 billion to research into type 1 diabetes over the past 40 years.